HomeBeddingDown Comforter Store • Choosing And Caring For Down Products
Down Comforter Store

How do I care for my down comforter and pillows? When you first unpack your down comforter or pillow, it may appear wrinkled and flat. You can restore the natural loft by vigorously shaking or fluffing in your dryer on LOW. Air your new comforter or pillow out of direct sunlight, for a day or two before using for the first time and then every 3 to 6 months thereafter. With proper care, your down comforter or pillow will give you years of comfort. A comforter cover or pillow protector will extend its life even more..
Comforter Cleaning

Hand wash or machine wash your down comforter separately, in a large tumble washer. Use WARM water and mild detergent on DELICATE (do not bleach). Make sure it's thoroughly rinsed before drying on LOW in a large-capacity dryer. You may need to gently steam the fabric shell of your comforter to remove stubborn wrinkles but NEVER IRON. We recommend, have your down comforter professionally dry cleaned.
back to top arrow

Pillow Cleaning

Dry clean only. Take your down and feather pillow to a reputable dry cleaner experienced in cleaning such items. Do not machine wash or dry clean in a do-it-yourself cleaner. Pillows When was the last time you bought new bed pillows? If you are like most Americans, it's been a while. But sleeping on comfortable, clean pillows is essential to a healthy, rested you. By putting off your pillow purchases, you're postponing your best sleep and a more energetic, healthy life. Indulge yourself in fresh pillows and ensure the comfort you deserve and the rest you need.

back to top arrow

How can I tell if I need a new pillow?

On average, pillows should be replaced every 2-3 years. But some pillows wear faster than others. To find out whether you need a new pillow, try these simple tests.

For feather or down pillows, fold your pillow in half (or for larger pillows, into thirds) to squeeze out the air. If the pillow stays folded when you release it, now is the time to buy a new pillow. Down pillows should spring back into their original shape and fluffiness.

For synthetic pillows, put your pillow on a flat surface and fold it in half (or thirds, for larger pillows) to squeeze out the air. Put a hardback book, something lighter than War and Peace but heavier than Pat the Bunny, on it. The pillow should toss the book and bounce back into its original shape. If it doesn't, you need to get a new pillow.

What other clues indicate that I need a new pillow? Your pillow no longer looks or feels the way it did when you bought it. Your pillow has become stained or visibly dirty. Your pillow is lumpy or out-of-shape. Your pillow has become uncomfortable. Your back, neck, knees or ankles are really sore after a night's sleep.
back to top arrow

What kind of pillow should I buy?

The most common question about buying a pillow is "how do I choose between all the different kinds to find the one that's right for me?" Selecting a pillow is a very personal process. But there are some general rules that will make it easier for you. The main categories of pillows selection - the "Three Fs" - are firmness, fill and fabric (or ticking). Knowing the "Three Fs" will help make choosing the perfect pillow a snap for you.
back to top arrow

What firmness should I choose?

Choosing the right firmness is essential to having a comfortable sleep and also to keeping your neck and spine in alignment. But how do you know which firmness level is right for you? Finding the right firmness for your pillow has a lot to do with how you sleep. While most people unconsciously move around as they sleep, nearly everyone tends to fall asleep in the same position each night. That's what you use to choose the best firmness for you pillow. It's important to consider how you start out sleeping, not how you end up.

If you sleep on your stomach, choose a softer, light fill pillow. A pillow with less fill tends to be flatter, which will keep your neck from hyper-extending during the night. This design ensures that you sleep without neck strain, guaranteeing the most comfortable night's rest.

If you sleep on your back, choose a medium firm, average fill pillow. A medium pillow gives gracious support to your neck and back while providing some plush softness to cradle your head. Most medium pillows cushion your head in the proper sleeping position so you won't twist and strain your neck during the night.

If you sleep on your side, choose a firm, extra fill pillow. These solid pillows provide extra reinforcement to keep your neck correctly aligned and to prevent you from injuring your neck and back as you sleep. Firm, thick pillows give the perfect amount of support to ensure that you sleep free of tension and strain.
back to top arrow

What's the best fill for my pillow?

There are literally dozens of types of pillow fill that you can choose from. And all of those choices make it tough for most people to figure out what they need. How can you tell the difference? Here are descriptions of some of the most popular fills.

Down: The most popular and luxurious type of fill, down, is made from the delicate tufts that cover geese beneath their feathers. Down is exceptionally fluffy and provides unmatched softness and sumptuousness. Unlike down, feathers are flat and have quills running through their centers. Though they are not as delicate as down, feathers provide support and softness at a value price. Down pillows are often categorized by fill power, or fluffiness, and weight (how many ounces of down are in a pillow). Generally speaking, the higher the fill power and weight, the higher quality the pillow. Down-like synthetics: These fills were created especially for allergy sufferers to mirror the texture of down. They, too, are fluffy and soft. But they don't rely on goose feathers for their extreme comfort.

Foam: Foam fills are specially designed to comfortably provide support to the neck, back and spine. Be aware that some foam fills are springy and bouncy, while others mold to fit your body and cradle you in a comfortable position throughout the night. Chief among these contouring foams are so-called "memory foams," which were created using NASA research and designed to conform to each curve of your body. These scientifically advanced pillows give unparalleled comfort and support.

Cotton: Cotton fills provide a pure, natural comfort while supporting you as you sleep. Cotton-filled pillows tend to feel firmer and flatter than down pillows.

Wool: Naturally a great insulator, wool responds to your body to keep you at a constant, comfortable temperature as you sleep. It also wicks away moisture, so you won't ever wake up damp from nighttime perspiration.

Buckwheat: Organic buckwheat hulls conform to the contour of your head and neck to provide ultimate support. These pillows are extremely firm, so they aren't for everyone.
back to top arrow

What type of fabric should cover my pillow?

Pillows can be covered with almost any kind of fabric, or ticking. But whatever the fabric, an important element of the "Third F" is thread count. Generally, the higher the thread count, the higher the quality and comfort level of the material.

For down or feather pillows, a high thread count is essential, because the fabric will keep any stray quills from poking your face though the material. For allergy sufferers, ticking serves an additional purpose. A higher thread count in the material covering the pillow will help prevent dust mites and other tiny pests from burrowing in your pillow. This makes your pillow cleaner and keeps irritants away from your eyes, nose and face.
back to top arrow

How do I care for my pillows?

Many people assume that you can't wash pillows without destroying the unique shape and fullness that prompted you to buy a specific pillow in the first place. But most manufacturers recommend that you clean your pillows in hot water every 6 months. Frequently washing your pillow will keep it from accumulating microscopic dust mites, mold, mildew and other bacteria - as well as perspiration and drool - which permeate pillowcases and settle into pillows beneath.
back to top arrow

Washing Tips

Most pillows can simply be cleaned in your washing machine. But be sure to check the labels on your pillows before putting them through the spin cycle. If your pillow cannot be machine-washed, try spot cleaning it with a mixture of water and vinegar or a mixture of water and soap. If you spot clean your pillows, be sure to allow them to air dry completely.

If you have a down pillow, some people suggest that you wash it with a tennis ball. It sounds strange, we know! The ball helps to keep the down from bunching-up into a corner as it's spun around the washing machine. So when the pillow dries, the down remains evenly distributed and fluffier.

And be sure to let the pillow dry thoroughly before you put it back onto your bed. If a pillow doesn't dry completely before being put in its case, it could lose its original shape and comfort. What's worse, the damp, dark core of a pillow could become a breeding ground for mold or mildew.

But if you follow the pillow's cleaning instructions and allow it to dry after washing, you should be able to enjoy your pillow - and a comfortable, quality rest - for several years.
back to top arrow

Duvets / Comforters

Most people are captivated by the idea of snuggling into a luxurious down duvet But once they start shopping for comforters, there are so many choices. And unlike a standard, batting-filled comforter, the terms and categories of down comforters seem complicated and foreign.

Here's our quick guide to down comforters. We'll make it easy for you to sift through the feathery confusion - and to buy the perfect cloud-like comforters for you and your family.

What's the best fill for my comforter? Duvets, like pillows, can be filled with just about anything. And all of those choices make it tough for most people to figure out what they need. With comforters, the fill selection depends mainly on your preference. But it is important to know what the various materials are and how they affect the feel and quality of your duvet. For guidance, here are descriptions of some of the most popular fills.

Down: The most popular and luxurious type of fill, down, is made from the delicate tufts that cover geese beneath their feathers. Down is exceptionally fluffy and provides unmatched softness and sumptuousness. Unlike down, feathers are flat and have quills running through their centers. Though they are not as delicate as down, feathers provide support and softness at a value price. Down comforters are often categorized by fill power, or fluffiness, and weight (how many ounces of down are in the comforter). Generally speaking, the higher the fill power and weight, the higher quality the duvet. Down-like synthetics: These fills were created especially for allergy sufferers to mirror the texture of down. They, too, are fluffy, soft and warm. But they don't rely on goose feathers for their extreme comfort. Cotton: Cotton fills provide a pure, natural comfort while snuggling you as you sleep. Cotton-filled comforters tend to feel flatter than down comforters. Wool: Naturally a great insulator, wool responds to your body to keep you at a constant, comfortable temperature as you sleep. It also wicks away moisture, so you won't ever wake up damp from nighttime perspiration.

What kind of fabric should cover my duvet? Most duvets are covered with 100% cotton ticking to ensure a smooth, crisp finish for the lush comforters. Though some ticking may vary slightly - oftentimes, non-allergenic or blended material is used - the most important element of choosing a fabric is thread count. Thread count refers to the number of threads sewn per inch in a particular fabric. In general, the higher the thread count, the silkier the fabric is to the touch.

But in the world of comforters and ticking, thread count serves an additional purpose. The tighter weave of high thread count fabrics also acts as a natural "down barrier," keeping any quills from poking through the fabric. So the high thread count ticking offers a dual benefit: It provides a sleek outer shell for the duvet and it protects you from the needle-edged quills.

How do I determine the comforter's quality? The two most important indicators of duvet quality are fill power, or fluffiness, and down weight. Higher fill power indicates that the duvet is filled with larger, stronger clusters of down that come from mature geese. The larger down bunches are able to fill more space and provide more insulation with less weight - making for a loftier, warmer, more breathable comforter. These comforters last years longer than the smaller, more fragile down clusters found in cheaper, less filled duvets.

The color or nationality of the geese does not determine quality.

The fill weight is another indicator of quality in duvets. Like fill power, a higher fill weight suggests a fluffier, warmer duvet. As the weight and fill power of a comforter increase, so does the quality of the duvet.

What's the difference between the varied stitches and patterns on a duvet? Baffled, boxed, diamond, ringed There are so many types of patterns and stitching on down comforters. They may look different, but those stitching patterns also give the duvets different qualities and characteristics. So what are the various stitch patterns, and which should I buy? Here is a list of some of the more popular designs with short descriptions of their characteristics.

Baffled: Small walls of fabric are sewn in between the top and bottom fabric layers, creating box-shaped pockets that allow maximum lofting and minimal down shifting. This duvet style provides even, consistent warmth and comfort.

Boxed: This classic pattern keeps down - and heat - from shifting with rows of stitched boxes. Bigger squares allow down to loft fully for warmer comfort. Smaller squares offer moderate warmth.

Ringed: This pattern, unlike the boxed design, is "open," meaning the down is not trapped in one place by the stitching. Ringed comforters allow the down to shift throughout the duvet. The ring design may not provide consistent heat, but it allows you to concentrate the down where you are the coldest.

Karo/Diamond: The diamond, or Karo, pattern is partially open, allowing you the option of fluffing the down evenly or focusing it where you want more warmth. The diamonds give a lofty, plush look with the added bonus of down adjustability.

How do I care for my duvet? Most down comforters should be professionally cleaned. While down washes well, the large size of a duvet makes it difficult to wash in a standard machine. It's better left to a professional.

If you have a cotton or wool duvet, do not submerge it in water. You may spot-clean or mist the comforters with a mixture of water and vinegar. Believe it or not, the vinegar mix will neutralize any odors in the duvet. Be sure to air the comforter after spot cleaning.
back to top arrow

© 2014 BedBathWorld, LLC. All rights reserved.

SecurityMetrics for PCI Compliance, QSA, IDS, Penetration Testing, Forensics, and Vulnerability Assessment Click to verify BBB accreditation and to see a BBB report. BedBathStore.com is upfront

ABOUT SSL CERTIFICATES